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General Colin Powell died

The general, the first African-American US secretary of state, died at the age of 84, a victim of Covid-19 complications.

In a post on their Facebook page, the Powell family says that the general had the full vaccination schedule and thanked Walter Reed Hospital for taking care of it, where US presidents usually receive treatment.

“We lost a remarkable and loving husband, father and grandfather, and a great American,” the family writes in the Facebook post.

As a four-star Army general, Colin Powell was President George H. W. Bush’s Armed Forces Chief of Staff during the 1991 Gulf War, during which the Americans expelled Iraqi troops from neighboring Kuwait. He was the first African American to hold this post.

Powell, a moderate and pragmatic Republican, later served as President George W. Bush’s secretary of state. He is also the first African American to fill this role. The general was a key player in the George W. Bush administration in the fight against terrorism after the attacks of September 11, 2001.

Defender of the Iraq war, Powell delivered on February 5, 2003, at the United Nations Security Council, a lengthy speech about the weapons of mass destruction allegedly held by Iraq. These arguments were invoked by US President George W. Bush as the main reason to justify an invasion of the country.

The American president claimed that the Iraqi counterpart Saddam Hussein constituted an imminent danger to the world because of the chemical and biological weapons he had stored.

Powell later admitted that this speech “blemished” his reputation as it was fraught with inaccuracies and gaps in security information provided by other elements of the Bush Administration. “It’s a blemish because I was the one who made this presentation on behalf of the United States to the world, and it will always be part of my record,” he said.

US forces invaded Iraq and were in the country until 2011, where 4,500 soldiers died and 32,000 were wounded.

In an interview with journalist Barbara Walters in 2005, Powell said that “there were people in the secret service community who knew at the time that the sources were unreliable, that they shouldn’t have been trusted, and that they didn’t speak up. That devastated me.” .

As the main responsible for US diplomacy, Powell has had some run-ins with elements of the White House more prone to warmongering, such as Vice President Dick Cheney and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Despite this, Powell remained a loyal soldier, making no major protests or expressing his disagreement.

“Loyalty is a trait I value – and yes, I am loyal,” Powell said in an interview with Barbara Walters. “Some people say: I shouldn’t have supported, I should have resigned.’ But I’m glad Saddam Hussein is gone,” Powell said.

Powell announced his “mutual agreement” resignation upon George W. Bush’s re-election in 2004.

“We lost a remarkable and loving husband, father and grandfather, and a great American,” the family writes in the Facebook post.

As a four-star Army general, Colin Powell was President George H. W. Bush’s Armed Forces Chief of Staff during the 1991 Gulf War, during which the Americans expelled Iraqi troops from neighboring Kuwait. He was the first African American to hold this post.

Powell, a moderate and pragmatic Republican, later served as President George W. Bush’s secretary of state. He is also the first African American to fill this role. The general was a key player in the George W. Bush administration in the fight against terrorism after the attacks of September 11, 2001.

Defender of the Iraq war, Powell delivered on February 5, 2003, at the United Nations Security Council, a lengthy speech about the weapons of mass destruction allegedly held by Iraq. These arguments were invoked by US President George W. Bush as the main reason to justify an invasion of the country.

The American president claimed that the Iraqi counterpart Saddam Hussein constituted an imminent danger to the world because of the chemical and biological weapons he had stored.

Powell later admitted that this speech “blemished” his reputation as it was fraught with inaccuracies and gaps in security information provided by other elements of the Bush Administration. “It’s a blemish because I was the one who made this presentation on behalf of the United States to the world, and it will always be part of my record,” he said.

US forces invaded Iraq and were in the country until 2011, where 4,500 soldiers died and 32,000 were wounded.

In an interview with journalist Barbara Walters in 2005, Powell said that “there were people in the secret service community who knew at the time that the sources were unreliable, that they shouldn’t have been trusted, and that they didn’t speak up. That devastated me.”

As the main responsible for US diplomacy, Powell has had some run-ins with elements of the White House more prone to warmongering, such as Vice President Dick Cheney and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. Despite this, Powell remained a loyal soldier, making no major protests or expressing his disagreement.

“Loyalty is a trait I value ​​and yes, I am loyal,” Powell said in a White House interview with BarbaDo Harlem

The son of Jamaican immigrants, Colin Powell was born on April 5, 1937, in Harlem, and grew up in New York City, where he studied geology.

He entered a military career in 1958. He was initially in Germany and was later sent to Vietnam, where he was wounded. On a second mission to this country, he was tasked with leading the inquiry into the My Lai massacre, in which the US army killed hundreds of unarmed civilians. The tone of his report was criticized for implying that the Americans had no responsibility for what was one of the darkest episodes in the history of the US Army.
was Walters. “Some people say: I shouldn’t have supported, I should have resigned.’ But I’m glad Saddam Hussein is gone,” Powell said.

Powell announced his “mutual agreement” resignation upon George W. Bush’s re-election in 2004.

After the war, he served as Ronald Reagan’s national security adviser from 1987 to 1989.

The experience in Vietnam led him to develop the so-called “Powell Doctrine”, according to which if the United States intervenes in a foreign conflict, then it must deploy a powerful force with clear political objectives.

Colin Powell directly served three other presidents: George HW Bush, for whom he conceived the strategy for the US military invasion of Panama, which aimed to overthrow dictator Manuel Noriega in 1989. This success earned Powell the attribution of responsibility for Operation Storm in Desert during the Gulf War (1990-91).

Powell was also Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces under Bill Clinton.

Abandoned to a military career in 1993, Powell maintains connections to the field through lectures and books, having been repeatedly named as a possible Republican Party candidate for the White House, despite his independent status.

Later, in 2001, he accepted the invitation of George W. Bush, who chose the country’s top military man during his father’s presidency as his secretary of state.

However, in 2008, Powell broke with the Republican Party to publicly express his support for the presidential candidacy of Democrat Barack Obama. He also supported the candidacies of Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden.
A State Server

Reactions to Colin Powell’s death come from all over the world. One of the first to react was former President George W. Bush.

“He was a great public servant who began his vigil as a soldier in Vietnam. Many presidents trusted General Powell’s advice and experience. He was such a favorite of Presidents that he won twice the presidential medal of Freedom. He was highly respected at home and abroad. And, most importantly, Colin was a family man and a friend,” wrote the former president, still leaving words of appreciation for the general’s family.

The current Defense Secretary considers that “the world has lost one of the greatest leaders we have ever witnessed”.

“Alma lost a great husband and family a huge father and I lost a tremendous friend and mentor. He was my mentor for several years advice” recalls Lloyd Austin, who does not fail to point out that Powell was the first African American to be both Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces and Secretary of State.

Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright stresses that he has lost a friend. “Colin Powell was an American icon whose career in public service will always be celebrated and remembered, but to me, he was simply my friend Colin.”

“Although we grew up in different contexts, we connected through the stories of our immigrant families, our deep love for America, and our belief in its importance in public service,” says the former government official.

“He was a wise and principled man, a loyal friend, and one of the kindest people I’ve ever met. I’m a better person for having known him and America is a better place because of him,” concluded Madeline Albright.

Senator Mitt Romney highlighted Powell’s courage and character, as well as the legacy and honor that his example inspires.

From the UK, former Prime Minister Tony Blair wrote that Colin Powell was “a summit figure in American military and political leadership for many years, someone with immense capacity and integrity, a pleasant personality and a great companion with a lovable self and self. -derogatory sense of humor”.

“He was wonderful to work with, he inspired loyalty and respect, and he was one of those leaders who always treated those below with kindness and respect. His life is an example of not just dedicated public service but a belief in working across partisan divisions. in the interests of his country,” Blair reacted.

John Major was another of the former British prime ministers to comment on Colin Powell’s death.

“He was one of the best men I have ever known. And perhaps one of the best Americans who was ever president. Both in the army and in government, he led with calm authority and was an inspiration to all who served with him,” Major said.

“During the first Gulf War – as Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces – we could not have wanted a stronger ally, nor one who would command our Armed Forces with such respect and affection,” recalled the former prime minister.

Source: with agencies

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