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The revelations of a former KGB spy: Trump is an “active” to Russia for over 40 years
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A new book about the former U.S. President adds another layer to Donald Trump’s alleged and controversial relationship with high-ranking Russian figures. A former KGB spy says the American businessman was a “perfect target” for Moscow to gain power.

In the late 1970s, Donald Trump was a rising businessman in the U.S. and began to attract the attention of Russian intelligence services, notably in then Czechoslovakia. The American had married Czech model Ivana Zelníčková and was one of the perfect targets for the KGB, the Soviet Union’s secret services. The book “American Kompromat: How the KGB cultivated Donald Trump and related tales of sex, greed, power and betrayal”, published this month and written by journalist Craig Unger, brings new revelations about the intrinsic relationship, of more than 40 years, between Trump and Russia. And it all starts at one source: Yuri Shvets, a former Russian spy placed in Washington in the 1980s by the Soviet Union.

In the late 1970s, Donald Trump was a rising businessman in the U.S. and began to attract the attention of Russian intelligence services, notably in then Czechoslovakia. The American had married Czech model Ivana Zelníčková and was one of the perfect targets for the KGB, the Soviet Union’s secret services. In the book “American Kompromat: How the KGB cultivated Donald Trump and related tales of sex, greed, power and betrayal”, published this month and written by journalist Craig Unger, brings new revelations about the intrinsic relationship, of more than 40 years, between Trump and Russia. And it all starts at one source: Yuri Shvets, a former Russian spy placed in Washington in the 1980s by the Soviet Union.

After drawing attention to Russian intelligence services in Czechoslovakia, Trump opened his first large hotel, the Grand Hyatt, in Manhattan in the early 1980s. To equip it, according to Yuri Shvets, the businessman buys 200 televisions from Semyon Kislin, a Soviet emigrant who was the co-owner of electronics Joy-Lud. According to Shvets, the electronics company was controlled by the KGB and Kislin was a kind of scout. One of the targets was Donald Trump, at the time a young businessman who could help Moscow. “His vanity and narcissism made him a natural target for recruiting,” says Craig Unger, author of the new book, at a time when “the Russians were trying to recruit like crazy.”

However, the “charm operation” becomes even more detailed. In 1987, Donald Trump travels with his wife Ivana Zelníčková to St. Petersburg and Moscow: it is on this trip that he contacts several KGB agents, who praise him and encourage him to enter politics. “They played the game as if they were immensely impressed by his personality and believed that this is the man who should one day be the president of the United States,” recalls former spy Shvets.

Upon returning to the United States, an excited Trump begins to explore how he can be nominated by the Republican Party for a presidential race, something that would happen in 2016, when he was elected president of the U.S. As an immediate measure, the entrepreneur promotes political positions in the media and on the street. Trump publishes full-page ads in “The New York Times”, “Washington Post” and “Boston Globe”, where he addresses America’s foreign defense policy and questioned the country’s participation in NATO and its relationship with Japan.

In Russia, Trump’s action was received with cheer. Yuri Shvets recalls that when he was in Moscow he received a telegram that rejoiced at the new “hiring” of the American businessman as an “asset” of the KGB. It will have been like this for more than 40 years, until the moment Trump was elected – it is still worth recalling the suspicions of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential elections. However, Craig Unger does not believe that Russia’s intention was for Trump to reach the top US office. At the time, he was more of an asset and there was no “ingenious plan” for getting to the presidency.

Several people were heard for the book, including “Soviets who resigned from the KGB and moved to the United States, former CIA officers, FBI counterintelligence agents, lawyers” and analyzed thousands of documents and news “in English, Russian and Ukrainian “, describes a presentation text for” American Kompromat “. In this way, the author hopes, it will be easier to understand “the kompromat operations [compromising material]” that “documented the darkest secrets of the most powerful people in the world and turned them into powerful weapons”.

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